DHT – Distributed Hash Table

DHT – Distributed Hash Table

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In this section of DHT – Distributed Hash Tables we will consider how to implement a simple database in a P2P network. Let’s begin by describing a centralized version of this simple database, which will simply contain (key, value) pairs. For example, the keys could be social security numbers and the values could be the corresponding human names; in this case an example key-value pair is (156-47-7081, Johnny Wu). Or the keys could be content names (e.g. names of movies, albums, and software), and the value could be the IP address at which the content is stored; in this case, an example key-value pair is (Led Zeppelin IV, 128.17.123.38). We query the database with a key. If there are one more more key-value pairs in the database that match query key, the database returns the corresponding values. So, for example, if the database stores social security numbers and their corresponding human names, we can query with a specific social security number. Or, if the database stores content names and their corresponding IP addresses, we can query with a specific content name, and the database return the IP addresses that store the specific content.

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Building such a database is straightforward with a client-server architecture that stores all the (key, value) pairs in one central server. So in this section, we’ll instead consider how to build a distributed, P2P version of this database that will store the (key, value) pairs over millions of peers. In the P2P system, each peer will only hold a small subset of the totality of the (key, value) pairs. We’ll allow any peer to query the distributed database with a particular key. The distributed database will then locate the peers that have the corresponding (key, value) pairs and then return the key-value pairs to the querying peer. Any peer will also be allowed to insert new key-value pairs into the database. Such a distributed database is referred to as a Distributed Hash Table (DHT).